“Healer’s Voices” starts Jan. 15!

Where can you have a discussion with other healers, read a variety of guest blog posts, listen to interviews on a range of topics, get a free healing recording ~ all for free? Right here, on the “Healing for Healers” forum: http://www.kwanyinhealing.com/healing-forum.php! And it all starts now:

Jan. 15 — Myriam Haar, from Saint-Martin, practices Reiki and NLP, but she’s really an Awareness Coach, or an Emotional Coach, specializing in helping people post-trauma regain their power and transform experientially. She’ll be answering forum questions all week. See her site and post right now! And in coming weeks:

Jan. 21 — Erik Carlson, of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, will offer an interview and guest blog about integrating breath work into hands-on therapy, prana yama, qi gong, stuck energy, and much more. Quite the store house of knowledge!

Jan. 28 — Marina Ormes, of Eugene, Oregon, will also share an interview about her work with healers through astrology. See her discussion thread on using North and South nodes for evolutionary work. She’ll also share a guest blog.

Feb. 4 — Carla Forsyth, of Transference Healing in Denville, New Jersey, helps people rediscover their ability to self-heal and find mastery and ascension, through a variety of modalities and techniques. Should be an interesting week! She’ll be around to answer forum questions.

Feb. 11 — Carol Ann Barrows, of Bainbridge Island, Washington, is a vocalist and chi gong practitioner. She is generously sharing a self-healing mp3 recording — check this out!

Feb. 18 — James Burkhart, of Marina del Rey, California, is a body worker incorporating Taoist and chakra meditation techniques in his practice–and he markets Amazonian herbs.

Feb. 25 — Lauren Worsh, of Seattle, Washington, will share her thoughts in an interview and a guest blog post on “Sacred Nourishment: Loving Yourself, Trusting Your Body, and Healing Your Relationship with Food.” Be sure to ask her about the Law of Attraction as well on the forum!

March 4 — Shweta Parmar, of Flushing, New York, is an Ayurvedic Practitioner focusing on harmonizing and balancing ourselves not only for health, but also in relation to the Divine Mother and Mother Earth. She’s got quite a fascinating story!

March 11 — And speaking of Divine Compassion . . . this springs us back to Kwan Yin Healing. In March, I’ll present a series of free webinars on practically raising vibration for tangible, manifest results in health and transformation of life path–and some announcements about new programs. Enjoy the series!

HEALERS! Would you like a discussion forum on YOUR site — INSTANTLY? All you need do is open an html widget where you want the forum, paste the html code — and presto! The Healing for Healers forum will be active on YOUR OWN SITE!

Please just drop me a note for the code, or copy it from the “embed” option on the forum menu.

Thanks!
tim@kwanyinhealing.com

Healing Perspectives

I did a guest blog and an interview today for Talk Story TV, which features interviews and readings by writers, artists, and healers on its online TV/radio channel.

You can listen to the interview by clicking here.   The blog, “Healing Perspectives,” is below:

Two perspectives hold us back from the healing, health and happiness we deserve.

First, we don’t hold a clear vision of what health means.   We hold a idea of freedom from disease instead—if we aren’t sick, we’re healthy.   But there’s a world of difference among broken, not-broken, and thriving.   How many people get up in the morning feeling rested, grateful, and passionate about what they’re off to do that day, Monday through Sunday?    How many of us are spending that time with the people we really like, the kinds that jazz us up, as well as loved ones?  How many of us are doing the things that renew and sustain us, not just in the corner of a day, week, or year, but daily, even in the work we do?  And how many of us are living for someday, rather then appreciating in joy each moment of beauty?

Truly, even if they manage to remain relatively disease-free, many people aren’t truly living, and we can’t really call this condition “health,” not mentally, emotionally, spiritually, or even physically—just look at the physical posture, facial expression, walk and breathing of such a frazzled creature.  It’s not healthy, and in fact, not infrequently precedes eventual disease.  Contrast this, for example, with health from the view of a shaman, who might ask not about medical symptoms but rather questions like “When did you stop singing?  When did you stop dancing?  When did you stop enjoying stories?”  Notice these too are physical symptoms—singing, dancing, smiling—but they are not only harbingers of illness, but also indicators of perhaps a better term than health:  well-being.

I worked with a client recently who reported her chiropractor was amazed to see that her neck, injured in an auto accident the previous year, had straightened back into place (C1) and that her chronically high blood pressure had dropped to normal.  “Something else,” she told me.  “I found myself singing along with the radio in the car.  I can’t remember the last time I did that.”  Bingo.  Well-being.

When we’re not sneezing, but still living for one day when things will be different, we aren’t healthy, and we need to learn to stop accepting this condition, and especially not as normal.  Our lives are supposed to feel good to us.  Instead, we waste them in embracing mediocrity, instead of insisting on living as we were meant to live, fully, passionately, vibrantly alive.

Second, we don’t understand we are energy, frequency and vibration.  Yes, physics has told us this for over a century.  The technical aspects of this are not only well-known, but well-established as well.  What we perceive as matter is the interaction of vibrating energy frequencies.  It’s all we are—energy, frequency, vibration.   Here, we can look to not only our physical symptoms, but our emotions and thoughts as well.  If we aren’t feeling healthy, happy, peaceful emotions, we aren’t thinking quality thoughts.  Change the thoughts, and the feedback mechanism of the emotions changes with them.  And clarity and coherence of light at the spiritual level is reflected in clear, calm thoughts and emotions.

This is healing.  On one level, it’s as easy as letting go of what’s not working—conditions, emotions, thoughts, spiritual practice…it’s all tuning to different vibrations and frequencies.  Energy flows where attention goes, and when we’re hurt, we focus on the hurt—physically, emotionally, mentally, even spiritually.   Stop.  It’s re-creating the pain.  Instead, let go.  All healing is releasing.  Whether physical pain, emotional, etc., just let it radiate out in all directions.  Try it—the pain will stop.  Feeling mentally overwhelmed?  Stop thinking.  Focus on your heart energy instead.  Feeling spiritually empty?  Construct a daily spiritual practice meaningful to you;  focusing here instead of the emptiness will work wonders day to day.

Focus on wellness, on how a healthy body works and feels, on what emotions you want to feel, on what thoughts you want, on what spiritual condition.  What do you want?  Focus on that—not on continually feeling the lack.  Feel the joy of living your desires in the Now.  You will be happy, whole, peaceful, joyful, balanced—and truly healthy.

man on mountaintop

FREE Informational healing teleseminar replay

***Note:  This blog post originally announced the then forthcoming teleseminar.  You can hear the replay via the same link in the post below.***

FREE Healing Teleseminar – Nov. 11, 2012

What happens now after the October “A Wilderness Hike” daily blog post series is done?  On to the next project—and I’m really excited about it!

Sunday, Nov. 11, 2012, at 1:00 EST, I’m presenting my first ever FREE Informational Teleseminar on Reconnective Healing, The Reconnection, distance healing, and whatever else people want to know.  Registered participants can even post questions ahead of time on a private group Facebook page, so I can be sure I cover what people are wondering.  They can post questions during as well, and afterward, I’ll be checking back for questions that come up after the call too.

Here’s video with addressing a few basic questions for now:

AND….I ALSO have a few surprises in store for folks on the 11th!

To join in—simply Reserve your spot below:

Join the teleseminar

And congrats!   Confirm the email link and you’ll have all the information about access to the call and to the Facebook group.  You’ll also have instructions for joining via Skype, if you’d like to do that.

So you’re all welcome!  Please help spread the word—I’d appreciate that.  I’d love to see all sorts of people with questions or curiosity join in and ask away.  And Free is one of the very best prices available!   😉

And check this out—Minnesota Public Radio is among the media outlets that picked up my press release!   http://markets.financialcontent.com/mpr/news/read?GUID=22625871

From Wilderness to Wondrousness

So…this October 2012  “A Wilderness Hike” daily series started with the mission to both share some of my forthcoming “Getting Unstuck” book content and to explore what taking clients on a wilderness hike might look like.  Some people had asked me about this, suggesting it might/should be a niche, and I thought I’d open it to public comment.  Now, at the end of this month’s exploration, here are some of my thoughts.

I like Frank MacEowen’s blend of “pre-literate” and “post-literate” approaches.   After all, upon first arriving in the wilderness, a few hours go by as the conscious mind slowly lets go of its propensity to relentlessly spin.  “Literary” approaches might be the way to start—contemplation that recognizes we’re still at the conscious, thinking level—and then, as the experience progresses, easing naturally into the more connected, feeling, intuitive stages.

Wallace Stevens offers this poem in place of wilderness;  we could then ease into wilderness in place of poetry, traveling through an interim phase of creating our own art—poetry, music, journals, whatever is appropriate for each:

“The Poem That Took the Place of a Mountain”

There it was, word for word.
The poem that took the place of a mountain.

He breathed its oxygen.
Even when the book lay turned in the dust of his table.

It reminded him how he had needed
A place to go to in his own direction,

How he had recomposed the pines,
Shifted the rocks and picked his way among clouds,

For the outlook that would be right,
Where he would be complete in an unexplained completion:

The exact rock where his inexactnesses
Would discover, at last, the view toward which they had edged,

Where he could lie and, gazing down at the sea,
Recognize his unique and solitary home.

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View from Snowy Mountain in the southern Adirondacks

We could then, after walking for a few hours, sit and contemplate landscape as mirror, talking about some of the points raised in my “Getting Unstuck” book, especially about how making the Law of Attraction work for us includes melding the physical and spiritual, not thrusting either aside in favor of the other, recognizing that what’s around us *is* in fact reflecting our own creating back to us, whether what we’re seeing makes sense to us or not.  More walking could then just “allow” thoughts and reflections and insights to arise naturally—that magical Sixth Hour of clarity I mentioned early this month.

We could take a few moments to write our thoughts, then share our insights with each other, inspiring each other to further clarity with our celebrations of peace.  Later, we could share our artistic creations, poetic or otherwise.  And, of course, we could certainly talk about healing, about raising vibration, about any number of things along those lines.   Or I could bring my guitar and play an outdoor concert.  Or invite other musicians along to do the same.

But I’m a practical man.  As nice as all this sounds, I’d want the day to be more than just a nice experience.  I’d want it to make a difference.  From wilderness to wondrousness.  So how would that work?  A couple of thoughts.

I have in mind a full day’s hike.  That could be on flat land, or a climb.  Probably flat land is best for the contemplative nature of what we’re doing.  For that, probably John Brown’s Tract or similar hikes would be best—I could probably find more of these (I just tend to go for the mountains).  Some people might want to travel in for the day.  Others might like to camp nearby or in the woods.  Others might prefer a night in an Old Forge hotel.  All could be accommodated with a day hike.  Or in the Lake Placid region.  Or perhaps a cross-country ski adventure (without the musical instruments, or with cold fingers for writing—I’m leaning toward warmer weather hikes).

The hike itself could have the elements discussed above, but the experience could be expanded.  For example, we could have a PDF workbook for use a week prior to the event.  Or a telesummit, conferencing by phone or Skype, with or without the workbook, and a private Facebook group for mutual discussion or posting exercises and feedback.  And a telesummit and/or workbook/discussion for the week after.  Something like that?

And people traveling in might like to combine the trip with healing sessions or Reconnections;  we could work out schedules to complete those as well, making the entire experience a profound change, an initiation into a new way of being to carry forward from that point onward.  Something like that.

I’d love to read comments with people’s thoughts and suggestions about all this.  Please do leave them below!   And thanks!

Namaste.

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

The Mist-Filled Path

If you’ve never read Frank MacEowen’s “The Mist-Filled Path,” let me recommend you do so.  It is very closely aligned with the ideas I’m raising in “A Wilderness Hike,” as well as some in “Getting Unstuck” and a lot of what I have to say about music and healing.

MacEowen speaks of the Celtic practice of hillwalking, a pursuit that “reminds us of who we are” in this world of the “Sleepwalkers,” unaware of their true nature, as if in exile.  This process of discovery blends the worlds of physical and spirit, teaching us to walk in the “Mist,” to “walk between the worlds.”

For MacEowen, the landscape as mirror:

It is a splendid revealer of things not often seen with the eyes of everyday life.  When walking out on the land, it is good to invite the “eyes of the seer” and the “eyes of the poet” to be present.  These are eyes that see the true shape of things.  Poets and seers see things differently.  When we relax the literal thinking mind and enter a landscape with more fluid perceptions (a soft gaze), we soon find that we become changed.  We are then able to connect with our primal, preliterate selves.  This preliterate, or perhaps postliterate, state of consciousness opens us to the Great Mirror of Nature.

Similar to the procedure of Chi Gong and toning, MacEowen discusses “setting our root,” noting parallels to shamanism, to lnitiation, and to Vision Quests:

The Celtic tradition of divination and seership is rooted in an understanding that clarity of thought and vision can be found in nature.  It is no accident, for instance, that so many Celtic seers, ancient and modern, have been shepherds, drovers, and crofters.  These individuals are often out in the land hillwalking.  Their souls are customarily deep in the consciousness required to receive vision, spiritual insight, and prophecy.  This thread of the Celtic tradition understands well William Butler Yeats’ notion of ‘the condition of quiet that is the condition of visions.

Thus we have a “dying of an old way of seeing,” and a “rebirth of an even older way of seeing.”  Similar to Buddhism (MacEowen makes a case for ancient Buddhism among the Celts), the desires of ego lead to suffering and separation.  But the “longing of soul” is a path to peace, beauty, and the soul’s evolution.  “Grow the soul green again,” suggests MacEowen, noting that to “attune” to our soul longing brings “at-one-ment.”  And again, this is a melding of physical and spiritual:

The body is the sacred temple through which the shaman, mystic, or healer receives certain prompts and guidance.  We all have access to this soulful bodily wisdom, but we must open ourselves to its richness and not cut ourselves off form our own earthiness.  Our earthiness is holy.  In the word of the Rhineland mystic Hildegard of Bingen, “Holy persons draw to themselves all the is earthy.”

And so we move to the rhythms of nature and life.  We sing!  We dance!  After all, in Hindu traditions, there is an ancient phrase, Nada Brahma, meaning “the world is sound.”  Energy.  Vibration.  Frequency.   This is healing—and celebration.   “It is healing for us to remember our sense of place with the holy shapes of life.  When we make it a point to remember the holy shapes, we in turn remember our own divinity.”

MacEowen speaks of the Oran Mór, descripting it as the deep spring that fills the sacred well of the human soul, an ancient rhythm, an ancient melody that one hears in the wind, in the waterfall, in the beautiful strains of sound in Celtic music, song, and chanting.  It is a healing song, an enlivening song heard in the giggles of a grandmother, the whispers of a lover, the questions of a child:

The Oran Mór remembered becomes a level of human consciousness that can help us accomplish great things.  The macrocosmic dimension of this teaching is realized within the individual life as a microcosmic expression.  As a Sufi mystic once said, “Music does not produce within the human heart that which was not already there.”

Thus MacEowen explains well what this “A Wilderness Hike” series found at the start—there is a healing energy in the wilderness, a sound, a vibration, a mirror that shows us truth amid the usual clamor of the mind.  Through hillwalking, the Sleepwalkers can learn to walk between the worlds, becoming again who we always have been.

 

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

 

Dix Mountain

A long time had passed since my last true outdoor challenge.  But unexpectedly, I got a reminder of the power of wilderness, the magic in facing frightening challenges, and the glow and growth of walking through to the other side of the experience.  That’s what Dix Mountain became for me this summer—surpassing even the knee injury on Algonquin Peak.

I had long avoided climbing Dix Mountain.  I’ve seen it several times, sitting across the highway from Giant Mountain.  But I’d heard it was a two day hike, involving camping on the mountain, while I was focusing on day trips.  I also wasn’t anxious to cross the rock slide visible from the ground.  It didn’t seem like an enjoyable time necessarily.  I had climbed all three mountains in the Presidentials of New Hampshire’s White Mountains, and while I’m glad of it, they were long walks for hours up rocks.
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But that changed the day I climbed Mt. Marcy this summer.  Instead of camping out and hiking from camp, I rose early (middle of the night, actually) to drive to the Adirondack High Peaks and begin the 14-15 hour round trip hike near dawn, then driving home, arriving in the middle of the next night.  It was a long day, but doable, and I wanted to climb Marcy again.  I picked a glorious day, consumed a great deal of coffee, and took the photos from Marcy that appear in this October “A Wilderness Hike” series.

At the top, I enjoyed a long talk with the Summit Steward.  I mentioned Dix and my reservations, but she said, “No, you want to climb Dix from the other side, starting at Elk Lake, up through Hunter’s Pass.”  She showed me the trail on the map.  I asked about the time and the distance—about the same as the one for Marcy that day.  Hmmm.   Perhaps Dix was a possibility after all.  And a few weeks later, I was up in the middle of the night, heading for the High Peaks.
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I was looking forward to it.  Dix is different from Marcy.  Especially in the summer, hiking Marcy’s trail is like walking New York’s 42nd street—it’s popular climb.  Additionally, multiple trails branch off to other peaks.  It’s a network of activity.   Dix, however, is in the center of the Dix Mountain wilderness.  There is nothing else.  No trails branch off.  No lodges nearby house hikers.  Even the other high peaks around Dix have no trails—literally, no trails;  “46ers” looking to climb each of the 46 high peaks typically go “peak bagging” to climb the five in the Dix Wilderness—basically, scramble through to each one.  Wilderness.  Definitely not heavily travelled.  I passed one camp in a lean-to, and saw one other guy on the summit.

Right from the start, this was a different hike.  First, there was no place to sign in.  Oops.  This was private land, not policed by the DEC rangers.  People knew I went hiking, but they wouldn’t know where.  And I was alone—with just my dog.

Next, although this had been a dry summer, with yellow leaved trees at higher elevations, this trail was wet.  Very wet.  And rocky.  Slippery and rocky.   The entire way.  And although the day would hit 90 degrees Fahrenheit, I wore my jacket most of the way;  the trail was in the shadow of the mountain ridges, which again prevented the moisture from drying up.  Essentially, the trail paralleled a stream, climbing steadily.
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I was struck by the extreme feeling of wilderness.  I was in the middle of nothing, from a civilization perspective.  And nature—just didn’t care.  I was insignificant, another insect or raccoon or bear or whatever moving through probably the wildest spot I’d ever hiked.  This would be a place to go to disappear and die.  It was . . . sobering.  The trail continued, steadily up, now along the side of a mountain.  Wilder and wilder.  And then—across a ravine . . . and up.

I mean—up.  Straight up.  Suddenly I’m climbing over boulders, stepping over gaps twenty feet down.  If I slipped here, injured, I’d lay there and die rather than be found.   But these were crossed, quite a workout, safely.  Even my dog managed fine.   And then—the trail continued . . . straight up.   Literally.  Pulling up the rock faces up the side of the mountain.  Even used to hiking all summer, it was hard, tiring work.  I’ve never seen a “trail” like it.  A couple of times, my dog lay down and almost refused to continue—despite also being energetic and used to climbing and hiking.

We were in a hard spot now.  The day was getting late, and I worried about getting to the summit in time to get back down before dark—I did not want to be stuck in this wilderness in the dark.  Continuing was difficult going.  Descending was going to be equally difficult.  The next few hours, I would wonder whether I should continue or abort.  Unlike my other hikes this summer, I knew nothing about where I was, and there was no one to ask.  I was getting a little scared.  No mistakes.  No mistakes today.  I could not afford them.

I was expecting a fork in the trail where two ways up split.  But, somewhere I must have passed that already, because when I finally did find a fork, despairing over what seemed another hour or more to the summit, it turned out to be a junction with a trail from the other side of the mountain;  the fork I thought it was must have been passed noticed.  Twenty minutes later, I was on a ridge that turned out to be the summit.  I was there—and very relieved.  And very, very, tired.   So was my dog;  she stretched out, lay down on the rock, then over on her side, and slept most of the 90 minutes I spent at the top.

But now there—after leaving a cell phone message (coverage was possible at the summit, though not on the trail) with a friend explaining where I was, just in case, I settled down for lunch and the glorious, incredible views from every side.  It’s the most remarkable climb I’ve ever had.  Just beautiful.  Amazingly beautiful.  The mountains there are “in your face,” and continue peak after peak after peak.  If you can, climb this mountain.   It’s stunning.  Absolutely stunning.

After the scary climb up, hiking out the lower part after dark seemed not such a challenge (and I did have a flashlight).  This time, I knew the trail a little.  So I stayed at the summit as long as I could/dared, packed up, and started down.

Descending the rock faces was no fun.  Nor did my dog see the wisdom of pushing on, when clearly a better plan was lounging in the plush moss.  But we got down safely.  Oh there were problems.  My belt broke.  A pack strap ripped (I used my belt pieces to fashion a makeshift repair).  My shoes were soaked, and taking their toll on my feet, even with merino wool socks.  But, three hours after sunset, finally we were back at the car.  Safe.  Drove a little, slept a little, drove a little more, got home a little before sunrise, and slept like stone.

With glorious photos, and a memory for a lifetime.

Image

Shanti, just arrived at the summit, a few seconds before lying on her side for a well-earned hour’s nap.

And a very tired husky.

 

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

 

Self-Healing, part 2: Time for a new perspective

I injured my wrist in early summer.  I have been prone to tendonitis—knees, ankles, elbows—for years, with each small injury taking forever to heal again, and any sudden strain on these joints can quickly bring back the pain.  In this case, gardening was likely the culprit;  I’d been putting in a lot of shovel time, digging in the hard, dry clay to make homes for various new veggies, flowers, and trees I had picked up at the nursery.  Not serious, and hardly a crippling pain, but to try to play guitar, for example, was excruciating for a time.  I had to turn down two requests to play, as I just would not be able to get through even one tune.

Nonetheless, I have found that when I’m active, exercising (I run or cross-country ski almost every day), and eating healthy, regular meals, I have little or no pain—everything is flowing better, and everything feels better.   More is at work than a particular part in the machine.  We are whole, integral, and not a mere collection of pieces.

I have stopped accepting long recovery time as inviolately given.  Using what I had learned from my hiking trip self-healing discovery (see previous post), I concentrated on expanding the energy where my wrist hurt.  It would go away, then return, and I’d repeat the process each time.  No miracles here, which was fine—when we exercise and eat right to lower blood pressure, for example, we’re not expecting instant results, but that doesn’t mean improvements aren’t happening.  This happens a lot in my healing work too—ten days after the session is a much better guide than immediately afterward.  Once energy is flowing better, everything benefits.  And indeed, my wrist improved over the week—not completely, but substantially.  I could play again at least.

But something else happened too.  As the week wore on, I had a growing sense of strings of light through and around my hands, wrists and forearms, extending from shoulders to past my fingertips.  Just as tendons ripple through the forearm as fingers are flexed, so too these strings of light energy rippled with my activity.  Very cool, and it helped significantly with releasing the energy in my wrist, since I was now concentrating on the whole, not focusing on a part, which can tend to reinforce the condition—I know an online group dedicated to one particular pain syndrome;  they largely post photos of their condition and complain to each other.  Definitely.  not.  healing.

I returned to the Adirondacks.  The day was very hot, so I wore flat canvas boat shoes, despite my previous lesson in foot wear vs. foot pain.  I used what I had learned—I’ve become convinced that all pain and illness is essentially trapped energy.  We don’t fight it—we release it.  So as I walked, I continually released energy.  The strings of light in my fingers and arms also extended all the way down my back, from below the ground to over my head.  I walked six hours, with no pain or soreness anywhere.  Nice.  Very nice.

The last two hours of my hike that day, after the first six hours of walking through the wilderness trail, was up Black Bear Mountain.  While not sore, I was getting tired, especially my legs and feet, and I wondered about the wisdom of saving this climb for the end.  But I concentrated on the strings of light, and something amazing happened.  I climbed with ease.  I had a strong sense of being one of the big cats, powerfully prancing up the territory.  I felt lighter, stronger.  My dog noticed the change, and changed her gait as well.  I could see she was using the same energy, natural to her, rediscovered to me.

But here’s the thing—as I climbed, I was *less* tired.  Less!  I could still feel the tired muscles, but I had More energy, and could have continued for quite a while past the summit.  I was suddenly using ALL of my body’s energy, with far more muscular strength.  The same was true later descending, an activity usually murder on my knees, especially down this mountain, as the descent route is sharply down several steep rock surfaces.  But my knees were fine.  My legs were tired, but not sore, and I could have continued for quite a while more, even when reaching the car after the entire eight hour hike.

The next day, I got some more insight into this extra strength.  While none of the traditional muscle groups were sore from the hike, I did feel a very slight soreness in my calves, easily released, and a soreness in the muscles on the outside of my lower legs.  I didn’t even really recognize I had muscles there before—like the muscle behind your upper arms most people find when they learn to breast stroke.   I had been adding muscles to my climb that I don’t ordinarily use.  Letting my “strings of light” energy do the work had better orchestrated my activity.  This muscle was sore for a few days—though only when walking, as it was fine when climbing stairs (conversely, my calves were fine except when descending stairs).  I was literally stronger just by better using physical resources I already had, but hadn’t recognized.  Letting the energy guide me again, I realize that if I consciously kept my feet under my center of gravity when walking, even this soreness vanished.

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As we view things from new perspectives, we realize our limits are self-imposed . . . and can be readily removed, if we’re willing.

The point here is that working from the totality of our energy, we best allocate our resources.  Using total muscle groups in balance is just one example.  Consider yoga practice to balance energy;  often this will erase cold or allergy symptoms, simply because the body is working more efficiently and can better handle the extra stress.  Same with T’ai Chi – energy is flowing, and your entire body benefits.  Emotional and mental benefits accrue as well.  And of course, whether we call it prana or chi, spiritual benefits accrue too.  We are part of a system, a universal system, and like the economy, it’s meant to flow.

 

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!