Finding and Sharing your Gifts

One of the best qualities of a wilderness hike is beginning to find yourself.  That’s also the beginnings of how to present those qualities in the marketplace.

So let’s start working on your marketing campaign.  I’m going to address this as if you are job seeking, but the same applies to promotions.  Later, we’ll talk about what to do when there don’t seem to be job openings.

I can’t even begin to tell you the times I sat across from an applicant trying to drag out information while the candidate sat there quietly merely responding in short sentences when pressed with questions, most of it vague (useless) abstractions and generalities, until I finally gave up and thanked them for coming.  Next applicant.

Any good merchant needs to know what goods are in the shop.  Any good salesperson needs to…well let’s start.  Time to change our thinking again.

First, sure, the world is filled with poor sales people.  The world is filled with poor musicians too, but you don’t let that become what music means to you—you listen to the many, many very good ones.  Same here.

Sales does NOT mean hyper-pressure bullshitting.  Sales does not mean manipulation.  Sales does not mean playing games.  Stop that already.  Not many will be successful long with that ridiculous strategy.

Rather, sales is service.  People have things they need done, and they look for people who can do the job.  If I’m looking for a good bass player, I don’t care about his rap—I want to hear him play.  If I’m looking for a good graphic designer, I want to see a portfolio of her work.  If I’m looking for a good construction crew, I want to know what else they’ve built.   I want to know these are the right people for these particular needs.

And that’s what good salespeople do.  They identify needs and match their skills and service to the client’s need.  If you’re an awesome heavy metal bassist, but I need someone for a jazz gig, you’re not the guy, despite your talent.  And that’s OK.  You’re not going to hire my jazz bassist to sub for you at a heavy metal gig either.  It’s about matching needs to services.  That’s what you’re going to do.

Far too many people post a resume online or mail out batches of resumes and sit at home waiting for the phone to ring.  Good luck with that.  Sure, everything works sometimes.  And sure, try everything.  But not as your primary strategy, and not if you’re managing your time.  Prepare to be by the phone a very long time.

Why?  You’re putting all the work on the employer.  YOU are the product expert, because YOU are the one who knows YOU and YOUR SKILLS.  Don’t simply hope and wait.   That’s wishful thinking, not a plan.  Besides, the employer simply needs a qualified body, and doesn’t need to sort through all those resumes online or on the desk.  That’s not a good use of the employer’s time.  And it doesn’t bring your skills and goals to the forefront of this interaction.

Instead, target jobs.   Each resume and cover letter should be tweaked depending on where it’s going and for what specific position.  Each interview should be carefully prepared especially for that job.  And each follow up should solidify what happened at that interview.   Be what the employer is looking for, and be ready to ensure that happens, not simply to wait for it to happen magically.  It is a huge mistake to just leave yourself open to whatever, applying for anything the employer might have.  Rather than improving your chances, this actually hurts them, because you will never appear qualified, let alone best qualified, the majority of time.

Getting the job you actually want is ironically easier than a “I’ll take anything” approach.  First, you can focus on those specific qualifications, and that already is a better approach, because the employer can see how you would be a good fit.  There’s an old adage in marketing, “The confused mind says No,” and a vague fit is an unclear picture, a No.  Second, however dedicated you are to a “vague” job search, you can’t help but put far more effort into a search that simply means more to you.  You want it.  You’re determined to get it.  You aren’t going to let a few setbacks deter you.  And finally, you bring an energy, a dedication, an enthusiasm to something you love that shines through—and that is something, when it’s genuine, every employer is glad to see.  That’s the kind of people they want in that job—the kind that were made for it, the kind that love it.

In marketing, businesses often endeavor to find their “niche.”  You should do the same.  Who are the people you love?  What kind of people?  What do they like to do?  What are their lives like?  What challenges do they face?   These are the kind of people you want to work with—and people who love you, as you are, for who you are, what you think, and how you can help them with a piece of their lives, so much so that they’re happy to pay for it.  When you find that fit, not only are you happy, but also the business that just hired you feels lucky to have you.

Image
I walk here almost every day — it’s a great place to think and reflect.

When I was managing an independent New Age book store, we had one applicant who wasn’t really knowledgeable about the store’s contents overall, though she could get by as a sales clerk, a pleasant young woman.   However, in the back, the store also sold a small selection of cotton drawstring clothing.   Now I, true to my gender perhaps, know nothing and care nothing about clothes.  But Alya!  She started spending all kinds of time back there instead of upfront.  When I took a look, she had organized all the various clothes into outfits neatly pinned up at the end of each bookcase stack.  “That’s nice,” I thought.  But I had missed the point.  Instead of selling a few clothing items here and there, Alya sold people outfit after outfit.  People started coming in just for the clothing.  She was just doing what she loved—and the store benefited tremendously.

If we don’t count sleeping, most people spend more time at work than at home with family.  Do what you love.  For yourself first—life is meant to be enjoyed.  But also for your employer and for the clients you’ll serve.  Everyone benefits.  And that’s the way to sell your qualifications for a job.

 

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

 

Changing thoughts for changing work

“Your greatest successes are lying just outside your comfort zone.”

In my early days of wilderness hiking, back when I was escaping into the woods rather than proactively enjoying and renewing my life, I spent a lot of time wrestling with the business world.  I learned, slowly, to get comfortable, and then to get good at it, skills I would learn for a variety of enterprises later.   My “Getting Unstuck” book has a few chapters dedicated to job searches and business.  Here are some of the essentials.

Before we start looking at the business world—and when talking about a job, career, work, whatever your field or area, we’re talking about business—we need to change the way we look at business.

Three thought patterns to change

1) Are you jealous of successful people?  Do you look at someone with more fame or money and think you’re not getting your fair share?  Do you find yourself thinking, “They probably cheated, lied, stole, manipulated their way to the top”?  If you do—you will never be successful.

I learned this from Jerry Hicks, who in turn learned it from a minister friend, Chet.  “Well it’s true!” Jerry protested.  “They lie and cheat and steal!”

“You can be against their lying and cheating and stealing,” Chet explained, “But you’re jealous of their success at lying and cheating and stealing.”   There it is.  Subtle, perhaps, at first blush.   Is it the wrong-doing…or the success that’s the problem?  Is the perception that “They all do it” just a justification, an excuse for not measuring up as—admit it, if it bothers you—do you see it?

2) Next—if you think business is all about the almighty dollar, that it’s a God forsaken wilderness, that the only thing that counts is the bottom line, that people just don’t matter to these soul-less money grubbers…get over it.  The world is full of caring, committed business owners.

Suppose I run a decent size company, say 100 employees.  They’ve been with me for a long time, most of them, and we’ve grown the company together.  Now, these people have mortgages to pay.  They’ve got kids in college.  They’ve got various personal crises that arise from time to time—and they’re depending on this job to see them through all that.  Do I care about the bottom line?  Damn straight I care—these people are depending on me and this company!  See what I mean?

One company a few hours north of my home, a modular home manufacturer, had a major fire about a decade ago.  For several months, they kept their entire staff on full pay while the company rebuilt—a liability easily into the millions—even though there was nothing for them to do but sit at home.   Why?  Two reasons.  First, they didn’t need to start over looking for people and training them.  And second—what do you think happened to employee loyalty and cooperation after that?

Good businesses focus on people.  I know of one owner of a small chain of convenience stores who pointed out that he could make more money by selling the business, wholly or in parts, and put the money in bank CDs and earn a higher return, just like that.  So why didn’t he?  “I’ve got 100+ people working for me,” he said.  “What are they going to do if I did that?”

3) Finally, get rid of the word “fair,” as in “It’s not fair!”  Of course it isn’t fair.  And it shouldn’t be—it’s unreasonable for you to expect otherwise.   Consider—do you treat those close to you the same way you treat strangers?  And why not?  Do you treat a lover the same as a casual acquaintance?  That’s not fair!  And it’s not supposed to be.

A business owner’s job is not to see that life treats you fairly, but to run the company, helping customers, employees, and suppliers in the process, and often the community as well.  Whether you’re a good fit for employment depends on that business’ needs at the moment.   Learn to make this shift—people aren’t treating you poorly.  It’s just not the time and place for “fair.”

MacIntyre Falls on the trail to Algonquin Peak

A shift in thinking

Next, I encourage you to make a fundamental shift in thinking, whether as a job seeker, employee, free lancer, or entrepreneur—act like you’re running your own business.  If you’re an employee, now or potentially, you’re in the business of supplying labor, and your employers are your clients.  This shift is profound.

To begin with, “Please give me a job” is a poor strategy.   Even a relatively low paying job—say, $20,000 ($10/hr. for a 40 hour work week for 50 weeks)—costs employers quite a bit more than your salary.  Consider benefits, especially health benefits, which continue to climb in cost.  Consider training, which means somebody else stops working to show you how to work.  Consider turnover, doing that all again for another employee.  There’s the employer’s share of FICA, Medicaid, and so forth.  All in all, the rough estimate generally used is that you cost 50% more than your salary–$30,000 in this case.  So, essentially, even for a “low” cost job, you’re asking someone to gamble $30,000 on you (considering the first year they find whether you’re worth it).  That’s asking a lot.  Too much.

Instead, think like a business.  What are your clients’ needs?  What services do you provide exactly?  What’s visiting your establishment like—are clients impressed?  Or are they treated like interruptions?  Would they return to use your services again?  If not, do you have other clients lined up?  Or if they don’t want to pay what your services are worth, does the market support selling to someone else instead?  Is your business growing, or are your skills and services staying flat?

This may at first seem silly, but it’s a powerful paradigm re-alignment.  Many people think “I’ll work hard when they pay me more money!”  But no business would say “We’ll perform well when people offer to pay more.”  That’s why promotions and raises go to those working harder (or smarter) first.  And that’s why, if you don’t get the raise you deserve, you can readily market your services elsewhere (or if you can’t, you need to re-examine the market and your business situation).

Many a job applicant recites the routine “I work hard, I learn fast, and I’m a people person.”  In fact, I don’t think many have skipped that ritual.  It’s not impressive, and it tells the prospective employer nothing.

Understand—it is not the employer’s job to discover and evaluate your qualifications, nor is it the employer’s job to sort through all the applicants to see who’s the best candidate.  It’s the employer’s job to get a qualified person hired so everyone can get back to work.  Period.   Anything else is wasting the organization’s time and money (and remember, that company is people counting on the business doing well).  It is *your* job to showcase your qualifications.  And guess what?  The employer will *appreciate* this.  It’s what that person wants to and needs to know—and only you have that information.  Share it.

This will also help you start to own who you really are.   Take stock and tell people.  Your greatest successes are lying just outside your comfort zone.

 

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

 

To be Time Rich, Learn to Be

“Thus the Sage, doing nothing, leaves nothing undone.”  ~Lao Tzu

We always seem short on time as well as money.  This is a reflection of ourselves, not necessarily of outer “reality,” despite the difficulty in seeing that.  And hence, we have more time than we realize.

In Metaphors We Live By,  George Lakoff and Mark Johnson showcase the pervasiveness of considering time via the metaphor of banking:

Time is money.
You’re wasting time.
This gadget will save you hours.
I don’t have time to give you.
How do you spend your time?
That flat tire cost me an hour.
I don’t have time to spare.
You’re running out of time.
You need to budget your time.
Is that worth your while?
Do you have much time left?
He’s living on borrowed  time.
Use your time profitably.
I lost time when I was sick.
Thank you for
your time.

Time as money in a banking system is thus a limited resource, a valuable commodity.  Thus, we account for our time, keep track of it, quantifying what is actually a nebulous dimensional aspect of space.  That conceptualization, in turn, colors how we consider time and its possibilities and demands.

It’s not necessary.  Not all cultures view time this way, and in fact, would have difficulty comprehending such a strange construction (and it is a construction, not a natural law).   But it does effect our decisions and our work.

Anthropologists have found cultures where people work on average three hours a day, filling all their “work” needs within that time.  Economists have estimated that if we took out all the activity in Western culture that is really just taking things from each other and left just the productive endeavors—we’d be working three hour days, and with all the goods we enjoy now.

Our concept of time is particularly perilous because we can’t actually bank it.  Even “saving” sick days or vacation time is just rearranging available “earned” time.   Time doesn’t work that way.   And since we can’t store it, we can’t get rich on it.

To be time-rich, we have to live in the Now.  That means truly losing the idea of scarcity, seeing endless bounty in each moment instead—not as a philosophical or spiritual ideal, but as simple reality.

This is turn sheds some light on our misunderstandings of money.  Replace money with prosperity, a much more inclusive term, and hence, a much more accurate one.   It’s the mental/emotional/spiritual/physical difficulties that are creating our artificial financial barriers, so including all these aspects of ourselves in prosperity is crucial.

Consider the progression of the Pentacles suit in the standard Rider-Waite tarot deck.  The nine of pentacles shows a very wealthy and happy woman in her garden.  But the ten of pentacles shows three generations of a family, the children playing, the dogs doting on the patriarch, and a husband and wife engaged in discussion, and the pattern of the pentacles suggesting the Kabbalah’s Tree of Life.

To see real prosperity, though, move from Pentacles to Cups, i.e., from money to love.  The nine of cups shows a happy and wealthy man, but the ten of cups shows dancing children, a husband and wife embracing, looking out over their beautiful farm, a rainbow of cups framing the scene as if a spiritual halo.

Imagine making that shift.  Imagine seeing prosperity as love.  Love of what you do, love of whom you help, love of your place in the bigger picture—money/prosperity as reflected love…changing to this from an attitude of artificial scarcity would certainly be a tremendous step in both healing and in the feeling of a rich life—whatever you earned.

Love.  It’s more important than we generally realize.  Love is the key.  Love is the medium.  Love is the goal.  Love is the Now.  We have but to live it.

We see the Now as “Timelessness.”   What does this mean?  If we take it as an escape from the tyranny of time, then it will always be only a temporary reprieve from the perceived realities of the time track.  But if we recognize that it’s not “less” time, but NO time, not an escape, but the recognition that time is a created illusion, that it doesn’t exist, “No-time-ness,” that to be in the Now is not a stepping back but a stepping in to Awareness.  It is learning to Be.

To take this into our daily lives and live it presents a challenge.  But the alternative is to continue to live a fantasy.  Try it.  Really try it.  Breathe.  Allow more than do.  We are vibration, energy, frequency.  It’s what Napoleon Hill kept talking about in “Think and Grow Rich.”  Stop trying to get ahead by working harder.  You can’t still the pond by slapping down the waves.  Let it clear, and see.  You can learn to be time rich, and you can escape the illusion–not just the race.

Be where you are, and let the mists clear. This is where you always are, and always will be. The rest is the persistent illusion of mind/ego.

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

Money is remarkable easy to come by, if that’s all you want.

“Healing ourselves on the spiritual level involves developing a strong connection with our soul.  We heal ourselves on the mental level as we become aware of our core beliefs, release those that limit us, and open to more supportive ideas and greater understanding.  Emotional healing takes place as we learn to accept and experience the full range of our feelings.  And we heal ourselves on the physical level when we learn to honor and care for our bodies, and for the physical world around us.”    ~Shakti Gawain

Years ago, one of the primary worries I took with me to the mountains was financial—insufficient income, several bills, along with taking a risk to buy my country property back when I had nothing (I figured I could always sell for the equity if necessary, instead of always watching rent money fly away) meant money was moving around more than coming my way.  But in time, I realized what at first was startling to me—money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.

Quite a few people struggle with (well, actually, against) the reality (Yes!  The reality!) that money isn’t hard to come by (yes, I’m talking legally here—and ethically).   The trouble is that most people usually don’t simply want money.

Once, between projects, I took a brief stint as Executive Director of a local Theater, a non-profit organization using a historic space for community events.   They were broke, and wanted to expand their programming and increase their funding.   I had long held a lot of ideas for this small city community, and accepted the opportunity to grow a few of them.   But first, we’d need cash—and we weren’t going to get it by doing the same things that got them broke.

I remembered from my days managing Seven Rays Book Store, a metaphysical gathering spot, that customers would frequently come in and peruse the wall of cards from psychics, astrologers, palmists, tarot readers and so forth, asking how they would ever know whom to pick.  At the same time, those same card-posting practitioners would come in and lament the lack of clients.  I sensed opportunity.

I sent out an invitation to the practitioners offering them spots at $50 to come read for the day.  I also asked them if they’d like to give a talk, to educate participants and help give an idea of what they do.  Used to far higher booth fees (and sometimes a percentage of their profits), practitioners jumped at the chance, happy they could charge whatever they wished, and keep it.   I sent press releases to area media outlining the event and the talks as an entertainment option, and wrote a few guest columns to profile some of the practitioners.  We charged something small ($3 or $5 dollars, something like that, I don’t remember) for admission, and once inside, people could attend the talks and walk around to visit with several practitioners and to get a reading if they wished.   And we cleared—CLEARED–$3,000.    That easy.

A local restaurant owner in a nearby town had always loved psychic fairs, and asked about putting on one in her establishment.  I figured why not, and assembled a smaller group (for the smaller space) and made it a two day event.   Word of the early event had got out, and I had new people, from an FBI psychic profiled on NBC to a tea leaf reader.  I cleared over $2,000 for essentially a weekend’s work.   Several of the participants cleaned up too, taking home between $800 and $1,200 each.

I did one more event, renting a ballroom in a city an hour away, and getting a smaller response this time.   A local radio station did a phone interview with one of the astrologers, and a reasonable crowed assembled.  I cleared $1,500 that weekend, but the novelty was wearing off, and I moved on to other projects.

Image
Even in the wilderness, there’s a vast expanse of opportunity, waiting. We are surrounded by riches, even if they seem out of reach.

Tim Ferriss, in The Four Hour Work Week, points out that instead of waiting to be wealthy enough to travel and live or work in other countries, recognize  that many countries have such lower costs of living that it’s actually cheaper to live there than at home.  Alex Baisley tells of an Irish businessman he met in the Caribbean who had realized he could spend three months vacation every year in the Caymans without it costing him any more—in fact, if he rented out his house in Ireland, he’d come out ahead in the deal.  It may be possible to live the life of royalty right now, not someday.  Retirees are moving to places like Costa Rico, for example, to exponentially increase the value of their savings.

I see people dropping $50/week on lottery tickets, because “Hey, you never know!”  Yes you do.  The odds of getting struck by lightning, one in a million, are far greater than the posted lottery odds.  Do people go running scared in storms because “Hey, you never know”?  Others drop $50/week or better on cigarettes.  I used to on beer (the year I quit drinking, I put $5000 in my savings account).

If from age 20 to age 65 you put $200/month aside in a stock index fund averaging 8% over the long term, you would retire with $1 million and change on a $108,000 total investment—ten times your money.  Why?  Letting your investment compound over time.  If, for example, you waiting until age 40 and invested the same $108,000 spread over the 25 years to retirement ($360/month), you’d only have $340,000 at retirement.  If you waited until age 50, with only 15 years ($600/month), you’d only have $211,000.  Twice your investment, vs. ten times.  $150/week vs. $50/week.

This is where the excuses start.  “But you could lose money!”  Not likely over 45 years;  definitely a higher risk over just 15 years.  And there are other investments than stock market index funds—this is just one example.  “But I can’t afford it!” people tell me, as they pick up their iPhones, iPods, and laptops as they head outside to smoke.  “But I want to enjoy life!”  Learning to set aside a little for yourself first is very easy once you’re in the habit.  You won’t miss it.  Just remember—every dollar you’re spending at age 20 is ten dollars at retirement;  every ten dollars now is $100 dollars at retirement;  every hundred dollars now is $1000 dollars at retirement.   That $400 iPhone sounds different when it reduces your return by $4000.

Every so often you’ll see in the newspaper some janitor or similar not-so-great-paying profession passed away and left millions to some charity.  It’s not hard to do.  Being a millionaire simply takes a little discipline and a little time.  In the U.S., you could  even save it in a Roth IRA and pay no taxes on the returns.

So why don’t people do this?

Despite what they say and think, money is not that important to them.  Short term gratification is instead.  And that’s fine—just don’t mistake it as money problems.

To get beyond the perceived barriers (they aren’t actually there) about money means taking a look at ourselves.  We need to first get clear about who we are, what we want, why we want it, what lifestyle we want with it, who we want to do it with, and so forth.  This usually isn’t easy.  In her book Creating True Prosperity, Shakti Gawain explains:

“Most of the limiting patterns in our lives are rooted in deep emotional wounds that require a certain amount of time and attention to heal.  Even more profound is the spiritual emptiness many of us feel when we experience disconnection from our soul.  We can only heal this emptiness by finding a way to reconnect with our spiritual essence.”

In short, people don’t pursue the money because that situation, as all our situations do, reflects the inner reality of ourselves.  As long as we’re conflicted, so will our environment remain.  That kind of healing takes time—hence the perceived difficulty.  But that difficulty is not with money, but with personal healing.

It’s what I love so much about taking my problems to the mountains—several of them turn out to not be problems at all, and the rest are usually things I can do something about.  Turns out I’m not the victim of circumstance at all—including financially, hard as that may be so see at first.

 

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

Getting Unstuck: Feeling Overwhelmed

 

 (More tidbits from my forthcoming book, “Getting Unstuck.”)
(This “trail” starts at distant Elk Lake, up through Hunter’s Pass shown here–and then straight up the rock of Dix Mountain.  Very overwhelming–though I had no thoughts but the task at hand for one long 15 hour round trip.  And still not near the summit yet!)

“I’m just overwhelmed!”
“All I do is work!”
“Something’s gotta give!”
 

Any of that sound familiar?  You’re not alone.  Here are three points to help.

I.  The first and most important point to understand is that “overwhelmed” is not a situation.  It is not just how things are.  No.  It’s a feeling.  You are feeling overwhelmed.  Perhaps for good reason–but it’s still a feeling, not an objective reality.   And feelings can be changed–if you want to change them.  Why “if”?  Because often people like to feel overwhelmed.  No, overwhelmed is not a nice feeling, but being overwhelmed often gives people a sense of importance, a work ethic, an identity.  Overwhelmed is a feeling, and if you want, feelings can be changed.

II.  Next come three areas commonly ignored, three areas to stop and take stock:

1)  Stop trying to do everything yourself.

Ego, pride, embarrassment, and probably a few other emotions commonly stand in the way of this simple and frankly obvious point.  You are not, whatever you try to tell yourself, the only one who can do what you’re trying to do.  Stop going it alone. Forget the lone wolf argument–people are social creatures, and interaction with each other is how we are wired.  Even people like me and you, who like our quiet alone time.  Let others help you–they will be delighted.

2) Stop trying to control everything.

Instead of asking yourself “What should I do about this?” ask “Why do I have to do anything?”  The Universe will continue without your aid.  People will still breathe in and out.  The sun will still rise and set.  You are not the Boss of Everything.  Let it go.  Life will become so much easier, and run so much more smoothly, when you simply allow it to do so.

3) Stop taking on too much.

This ain’t rocket science.  If you’re feeling overwhelmed because you have too much to do, you’re taking on too many things.  Stop it.

Sure, I get that there’s a lot to do, and that a lot of it is important.  But it makes no sense to daily plan what can’t possibly happen and then beat yourself up for not accomplishing what had no chance of getting done from the start.

If you’re doing too many things, do fewer things.   Prioritize.  If that means less than you want to do, fine.  But decide which to do and do it, and feel glad of a good day’s work.

Remember–overwhelmed is a feeling.  You at least will stop feeling overwhelmed.

III.  And finally, there’s a difference between time management and getting unstuck.

First, time management.   Lots of help available here.  Probably at the top of the list is Stephen Covey’s approach, laid out in his book First Things First.  This, however, is far more than allocating the 168 hours of each week into the various pieces that make up your time life.

Covey turns first not to the clock, but to the compass.  Where do you want to go?  What are your objectives?  What is important to you in this life?  Those are your organizing principles.  Thus, your “big rocks” get placed first, then medium rocks, then smaller rocks, then pebbles, then sand.   But don’t let a sandstorm keep you from getting to the big rocks.  The important things–like relationships, or your children, or someone who needs help–take precedence.

Tim Ferriss, in The Four Hour Work Week, takes ideas like this much, much further.   He challenges multiple assumptions about how we construct our work and our time, noting that much of our structured time (i.e., structured for us) is wasted, and often working from home can be far more productive (acknowledging that this isn’t necessarily true for everyone).  He gives the examples of sales calls to business owners–an hour of calling from 8-9 and another from 5-6 accomplished more than calling all day.  Why?  He didn’t have to go through the secretaries on duty 9-5;  the decision makers themselves answered the phone.

Take the Pareto Principle seriously:  80% of our results come from 20% of our activities.  Invest time in isolating that 20%, and cut or minimize the 80%.  Ferriss points out that this need not mean expanding your 20% (though you may well want to do so)–lateral moves can also be satisfying.  What if you could make the same income you do now, even doing the same thing, but in half the time?  The remainder could be spent doing things you love, rather than reinvesting in work pursuits.  This in turn would give you considerably more energy during the time you do spend working–for even greater results.

The key is live the life you want to live–now.  Alex Baisley, of the Big Dream Program, is a genius at challenging people to construct their lives around five principles (“Juicy Realizations,” he calls them), considering them as an ecosystem, where all five are required.  I’ll let Alex explain:

Don’t get overwhelmed about getting unstuck from being overwhelmed.  The point is simply that you have a wealth of options.   Ryan Eliason suggests making a “Not doing now” list for the good ideas that you just aren’t going to get to for a while, if ever, and focus on the things you *are* doing.  Do the ones you want, pass on the ones you don’t want, and come up with a wealth of your own.  But recognize that you are not stuck, that you are experiencing a feeling only, and that change–even radical change–is not only possible, but also accessible.

 

Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

 

Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing

“In every person who comes near you look for what is good and strong;  honor that;  try to imitate it, and your faults will drop off like dead leaves when their time comes.”

~ John Rushkin (1819-1900)

Many people have shared with me their excitement about a wilderness retreat for the joy and appreciation of nature, peace, balance.  But sometimes a retreat is necessary for working through emotional pain, especially when that pain is internal.

I was asked recently about my take on honesty and forgiveness.  The occasion was a betrayal one person was trying to work through, but the group conversation evolved quickly into more universal themes.  I was struck by how the wonderful points shared as people spoke heavily stressed healing on many levels, and I’m passing it on!

First, let’s be real—when negative things happen, we need time to work through them.  There’s nothing wrong with that.  It’s a process, and that’s fine—even good.  Take time to heal.

At the same time, though, as long as we hold on to our anger and withhold forgiveness, we are clinging to the pain.  What may seem as directed at someone else is actually hurting ourselves.  Again…OK for a time, as long as we recognize what’s going on.  If we don’t see that, though, we can set up a chronic condition.

Forgiveness of others is also a prerequisite for something crucial for healing—forgiving ourselves.  Whenever we cling to pain, it’s always for reasons of ego (no natural instinct would make us do that).  What part did we play in the exchange?  Or are we beating ourselves up for poor choices or perception?  Outer anger covers and disguises this inner festering, even from ourselves.  This again can set up a chronic condition.

Here’s where honesty enters the picture in a major way.  To heal, we really have to take the focus off others and put it on ourselves.  That’s the only way to watch what is truly happening, and then we can start to heal the things in ourselves that need it—not cure other people from their transgressions.   Let go.  Stop clinging to needless pain.  Grow beyond it.  Forgive, and learn what you needed to learn from this interaction, even if the lesson was painful.  Recognize that this new knowledge and wisdom is a keeper—it applies to all new situations, so you truly have gained from this experience.  Make it a positive application.

People make mistakes.  Yes, even stupid ones they had no business making.  But we’ve all done things in retrospect that weren’t the best moves.   Understand people are dealing with their own issues and growth, however well or poorly, and that this is their process.  Focus on your own growth and process, and bless others in their journey.  Love and forgive.  You don’t have to repeat poor choices, of course—but forgive, and love them for who they are.  As best you can at first, even if that’s not much.  The effort counts.

Image
Sometimes we get in our own way, blocking the rest of the gorgeous view (photo from Dix Mountain summit).

This is the key to being “right-sized.”  We are each not the center of the universe, but one person among many, part of a group.  When we can see our part in interactions, we can start to see our role in daily life.  We are part of a group—many groups, actually.  Each member has a role to play;  each member is responsible for his or her own progress.   But if we place ourselves above this, we have lost the reality of our place in the group, and we’ve taken on a greater role than what we truly serve.  We are different, not better.  An architect building a home might indeed have the creative inspiration and direction that spawned the project, but the owners’ needs shaped that vision, and the tradesmen on the job are the ones who know how to make abstract ideas work in the field.  ALL these voices are necessary for a successful project.  All are part of this team—none better than the others.  And what a relief!  You don’t have to run the universe today.  Pressure’s off.

This vision, though, of knowing yourself and your growth and process, of knowing your place as one of the many on your various teams in life, your important place at that, just as the others are important, is really a lynch pin for healing and for a healthy life.  It is truly who you are, in gratitude for all those around you as well.  It’s a vision of harmony and well-being, one model each day, if we only see it for what it is.  Forgive others.   Love them.  And forgive and love yourself.  They, and you, are just that special.  When we let go of pain, we begin to live in love—daily, constant, universal love.

At the end of the day, say thank you. Even on the crappiest day, it was not all bad.  Be grateful.  If you have trouble with this, make a list–yes, I get the irony of listing what you are having trouble articulating.  Start with A–Apples?  Alice?  Anesthesia?  Alaska?  Animals?  Anagrams?  Then B.  Then C, D, E, F, etc.   But end the day grateful and thankful, even if you need to work a bit to get there.   Your mind will start to quiet, your nerves will slowly unwind, your muscles will begin to relax (didn’t know you were that tense until you started relaxing), and you will sleep better–and be better prepared for the following day.

In time, day by day, you’ll find yourself progressing.  Then do the same for the beginning of your day—wake up grateful and glad to start the day.  It will happen.

Emotions are reflections of the quality of our thoughts.  That’s a hard thing to see at first, and it takes changing our perceptions and assumptions.   But as such, they are meters indicating where we are on our journey.  Appreciate and heed them, but know the way out is not external, but the quality of internal thoughts.  With better feelings will then come better conditions, not vice versa.

That’s among the reasons I advocate wilderness experiences.  That clear, calm space, without agenda, allows our projections to start to drop away, leaving the heart of the matter for us to address effectively.  It’s to get to the heart.

By the way, feel free to visit the “Healing for Healers” discussion forum and posting questions.  All are welcome.
Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!

We are not our thoughts

No matter how many times they’re rejected, the waves still kiss the shore.  That’s the goodness of the universe we’re born into.

We are not our thoughts.  We don’t even need thoughts.  Our existence does not depend upon thinking.  Thoughts are important tools, but they aren’t our identity.  We need to remember how to live, how to just be, independent of the interruption and distortion of thinking.  Don’t let the tools run the craftsperson.

Our thoughts, instead, are how we create.  Before there can be a chair, someone has the idea of “chair,” prior to making one.  Before there’s a house, someone plans it out, from the mind, eventually in every detail before it is built.  Before anyone had any kind of house, someone conceived the idea of building one, prior to any houses existing.  We think the thoughts first, and later realize the physical manifestation.

Now, because we commonly believe we are our thoughts, we think incessantly. Descartes even enshrined this in our philosophy—I think;  therefore I am.  But it’s backwards, as we typically understand it.  Thinking may well be evidence for our existence (which is what Descartes was getting at), but that thinking is not  our existence itself.  To paraphrase Yeats, the falcon is flying the falconer.  Or at least thinks it is, and wants to continue thinking that.

The mind/ego will fight hard to keep its usurped throne.  This is why a wilderness hike takes time to bring you to clarity and mental peace.  But the mind/ego is not truly in control, and it’s not really you.  Instead of thinking your way out of all your troubles—stop thinking.  Seriously.  That alone will be an improvement (and why wilderness hiking helps so much).  Then set about purposeful creation—and enjoy the joy you are meant to feel.  Let it happen.  Allow.

Eckhart Tolle tells of a talk Krishnamurti gave in his later years.  “Do you want to know my secret?” the Indian saint asked.  Everyone listened.  “Here is my secret,” he said.  “I don’t mind what happens.”  We do plan, of course, so this is a distinction hard for us to grasp at first.  Simon Sinek offers a clarifying point in the title of his book:   “Start with Why.”  When we start with why we are doing something, the what  and the how  fall into place naturally.

When you want something, ask yourself why you want that.  If the answer has you smiling, excited, happy, full of joyous anticipation, then you’re on to something. Even if things work out differently than you’d planned, you’ll still find yourself on an interesting, enticing path, only farther along it than you were before, and having fun.

To quote Simon Sinek again—there’s a reason we say “arts and sciences,” never “science and art.”  The “art” always comes before the “science.”  Similarly, we don’t set out to win “minds and hearts,” but rather, “hearts and minds,” in that order.

In one segment of the documentary “The Living Matrix,” researchers show a series of images, some negative, some positive, and measure heart and brain activity for each.  Not surprisingly, the heart and brain waves are different for the positive images than for the negative images.  But this next part is fascinating.

The researchers then had subjects watch randomly generated images on a computer screen, not knowing which would come up—in fact, not even the computer knows.  And again, the heart and brain waves responded differently depending on the positive or negative image.  But what’s really interesting is the order of these “responses.”  First the heart wave would change, then the brain wave changed, and only then did the image change.  The heart “responds” first, informing the brain, not the other way around, and both “respond” before the random image even appears.  My friends, we are much more than we typically realize, and at essence, we are heart-centered.

In a related discovery, Dr. Gary Schwartz measured the heart and brain waves of both practitioners and clients in Reconnective healing sessions.  He found that during a session, the practitioner’s heart wave changes, followed by the client’s brain waves.  Interesting, no?

It—whatever “it” is, in the sense described in “Zen and the Art of Archery”—comes from the heart.  When our thoughts follow our heart, we are in purposeful alignment, and our positive emotions resonate with it.

Does this all sound a bit too mystical?  Are you more of a practical, business-oriented nature?  Then you need to spend a little time with Napoleon Hill.  You may remember him for his most famous book, “Think and Grow Rich.”

Napoleon Hill was hand picked by Andrew Carnegie to investigate and codify a formula, a philosophy of success.  What Carnegie and Hill laid out was not a business tactic, but a “vibration” as a basis for a Law of Attraction.  This was “the secret” mentioned throughout Hill’s books, based on interviews of hundreds of extremely successful businessmen.  The ability to focus the mind on a definite purpose and to see that purpose fulfilled, believing it, no matter how lofty, was the magical key to success.

Have a Definite Major Purpose, Hill stressed.  Then a reasonable plan for achieving that purpose.  Adjust as necessary, and don’t give up.  Ever.  Keep the focus on the success, not the lack of it.  In fact, originally, Hill told Carnegie he was the wrong man for the job, coming from humble origins.  Carnegie made clear as long as Hill kept to that vision of things, he would always manifest lack.  Sound familiar?

Hang in there.  No matter how many times they’re rejected, the waves still kiss the shore.  That’s the goodness of the universe we’re born into.  Truly, all we want is already here.  We just have to believe it.  And that’s from not the mouth of mystics, but from the fabulously successful.

Image
What is closest may seem clearest, but the rest is just as real [view from Dix Mt.]
Are you interested in hearing more about Wilderness Hikes as projects evolve in the future? Let me know here, so I have a list of those interested ready to go, by clicking here (and page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Wilderness Hike” list.

If you’d like to hear about my “Getting Unstuck” book as it gets closer to release, let me know by clicking here (and you’re welcome to do *both,* of course–page all the way down to click “Sign Up” at the bottom):
Join the “Getting Unstuck” list.

October 2012 is a series of daily posts about “A Wilderness Hike,” taking readers through the healing of wilderness experience and glimpses of my work at Kwan Yin Healing and of my book, “Getting Unstuck.”

You can read the series from the start via the links here:

Oct. 1:    A Wilderness Hike
Oct. 2:   The Sixth Hour
Oct. 3:   Snowy Mountain
Oct. 4:   Letting Go of Baggage–the Wilderness Way
Oct. 5:   “Bear” the Thought
Oct. 6:   Mountain.  Buddha.  Impermanence.
Oct. 7:   The Rewards of Rain
Oct. 8:   Finding the Keys
Oct. 9:   “I’d love to, but times are bad.”
Oct. 10:  Attracting the Law of Attraction
Oct. 11:  We are not our thoughts
Oct. 12:  Honesty, Forgiveness, Healing
Oct. 13:  Getting Unstuck:  Feeling Overwhelmed
Oct. 14:  Money is remarkably easy to come by, if that’s all you want.
Oct. 15:  To be Time Rich, Learn to Be
Oct. 16:  Changing Thoughts for Changing Work
Oct. 17:  Finding and Sharing your Gifts
Oct. 18:  Do you want to be the boss?  Be sure you want to run the show.
Oct. 19:  Finding jobs within jobs
Oct. 20: Bright Mountain Dream
Oct. 21: Escape the Wilderness of Addictions
Oct. 22: The Importance of Spiritual Direction
Oct. 23: In Search of Enlightenment
Oct. 24: Relationship Thoughts from the Wilderness
Oct. 25: We learn in realtionships
Oct. 26: Chrysalis
Oct. 27: Self-Healing, part 1
Oct. 28: Self-Healing, part 2:  Time for a new perspective
Oct. 29: Dix Mountain
Oct. 30: The Mist-Filled Path
Oct. 31: From Wilderness to Wondrousness

Enjoy!